How To Deal With Stress During COVID-19 Pandemic

Social distancing and teleworking due to the Covid-19 pandemic have increased stress and depression among people worldwide. In this article, we shed light on some ways you manage stress.

Some groups of people are at a higher risk of anxiety and stress than others, and these groups, in particular, need support from their loved ones.

People At A Higher Risk Of Stress

Although individuals of every age are dealing with strong emotions during the pandemic, if you are in the following groups and feel a heightened sense of stress and anxiety, know that you are not alone.

  • Small children and teenagers
  • Individuals who have a mental disorder(s)
  • Doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers
  • Older adults who have a chronic illness
  • Those addicted to drugs

Common Symptoms Of Stress

Some early detectors or stress include:

Excessive anger and irritability

Restlessness and difficulties falling asleep

A feeling of sadness, anxiety and fear

Overthinking decisions

According to Healthline, chronic stress can lead to physical ailments such as:

  • Heartburn,
  • Rapid breathing,
  • Pounding heart,
  • Risk of heart attack,
  • Insomnia,
  • Weakened immune system,
  • High blood sugar,
  • High blood pressure,
  • Fertility problems, and
  • Stomachache.

In the United States, several healthcare centers and psychotherapists provide anxiety counseling in Chicago as well as other major cities. You can seek their help if you feel overwhelmed by stress. Here are some positive coping skills to reduce stress levels.

Set Limits Around News Updates

Take a break from social media and news channels. Checking out constant updates on COVID-19 can leave you emotionally exhausted and develop feelings of fear and anxiety. So instead of listening to coronavirus news, watch inspirational and positive shows. This can boost your mood and well-being.

Stay Close To Nature

Nature is a great healer. Some people say nature consumes your stress and gives you peace. Spending time in nature gives you the power to cope with the mental stress of isolation. A little as 20 minutes a day in nature also improves your physical health. Do gardening, go bird-watching or take a walk in the park.

Exercise Daily

Exercise can do wonders for your psychological well-being. According to the World Health Organization, to stay healthy & stress-free, the average person should do moderate-intensity exercise for 2:30 hours or an intense workout for 1:15 hours a day. If gyms near you are still closed due to social distancing, find other ways to exercise.

Connect With Closed Ones

It is common to feel lonely, scared and anxious during times of uncertainty. However, the support of your loved ones can make a significant difference. Connect with your friends, family and colleagues via phone, video calls and messaging. You can also celebrate birthdays and anniversaries via virtual conferencing. 

Seek the Help of a Therapist

Many people are struggling with stress and depression during the pandemic. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 4 out of 10 adults in the United States have symptoms of COVID-19-related stress. This number is increasing day by day. Help is available from a variety of clinicians and therapists. You can seek anxiety counseling from the best counselors of the U.S. and other parts of the world to manage your stress and depression.

The Bottom Line -:

Managing and coping with stress during a pandemic is a tough road. Be very patient with yourself, and be courageous in seeking professional help.

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